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Where to get support

I think it's important to point out that I am not a trained medical professional or therapist. Recovery isn't linear, and what I mean by this is that there will be bumps along the way, setbacks that make you feel you are right back at your lowest. Do not worry though, there are some amazing folk out there who want to help. I googled everything when I was poorly, but this isn't always a good thing as you really can't self-diagnose - make that appointment with your GP!

I've pulled together a little list of contacts, there are loads of others out there and hopefully you will find it useful.

If you feel suicidal or feel like harming yourself or others:
  • Call 999
  • Go to your nearest A&E department. You can search for your local accident and emergency department through the NHS Choices website.
For non-emergency situations:
  • Visit your GP - I made a list of everything I wanted to tell my GP and we went through it together
  • Check out websites like NHS Choices for some initial information
Samaritans
Confidential support for people experiencing feelings of distress or despair.
Phone: 116 123 (free 24 hour helpline)

Mind
Promotes the views and needs of people with mental health problems.
Website: www.mind.org.uk
Text: 86463
Phone: 0300 123 3393 (Mon-Fri, 9am-6pm)

Mind Blue Light Infoline is just for emergency service staff, volunteers and their families and provides information on a range of topics including staying mentally healthy for work; where to get support and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).
Phone: 0300 303 5999 (Mon-Fri 9am-6pm except for bank holidays)
Email: Bluelightinfo@mind.org.uk
Text: 84999
Anxiety UK
Charity providing support if you've been diagnosed with an anxiety condition.
Phone: 08444 775 774

Rethink Mental Illness
Advice and support for people living with mental illness.
Website: www.rethink.org
Phone: 0300 5000 927 (Mon-Fri, 9:30am-4pm)

Re-Co-Co (Newcastle upon Tyne)
The Recovery College Collective are a voluntary, charitable organisation that support people with mental health difficulties towards finding and maintaining their own recovery. They offer a wide range of courses and workshops which are accessible following enrollment.
Website: www.recoverycoco.com
Phone: 0191 261 0948

North Tyneside Talking Therapies
North Tyneside Talking Therapies provides psychological assessment and treatment to adults who live in North Tyneside who are suffering from common mental health problems.
Phone: 0191 295 2775

Talking Helps Newcastle
Newcastle's free, confidential talking therapy service, delivered on behalf of the NHS. It is available to anyone aged 16 and above who is registered with a GP surgery in Newcastle upon Tyne. You can self refer online or via phone.
Website: www.talkinghelpsnewcastle.org
Phone: 0300 555 1115

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